THEORETICAL AND EMPIRICAL RESEARCHES IN URBAN MANAGEMENT

 

Number 5(14), February 2010 

 

1. CITIES COMPETITION, PLACE MARKETING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTH EUROPE: THE BARCELONA CASE AS FDI DESTINATION

Theodore METAXAS

Department of Economics, University of Thessaly

 Greece

The aim of the article is to focus on the especially interesting area of South Europe and to present and points out the strategic development process, in one of the most representative examples of its successful implementation, which is the city of Barcelona. Barcelona, which in the last 20 years, managed to increase its competitiveness becoming one of the most attractive investment destinations on international level. The city’s economic dynamism, its strategic position in the South of Europe and a clearly-consolidated international projection have turned the economic area of Barcelona into an international platform of economic activities, a driving force behind development in Southern Europe, especially oriented towards new, emergent, competitive and international sectors with an uninterrupted growth of their foreign markets.  ...

2. REGULATING URBANISATION IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA THROUGH CLUSTER SETTLEMENTS: LESSONS FOR URBAN MANGERS IN ETHIOPIA

Davidson Sunday Ashemi ALACI

Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Federal Polytechnic Idah

Nigeria

Against the backdrop that urbanization in sub-Sahara African (SSA) countries, including Ethiopia, has occurred without the attendant growth and development spillovers; and that the inherent benefits of urbanization are threatened by the fast pace of urbanization, unparalleled speed and the uneven spatial spread, This paper posits that this challenge and indeed urban management can be address through a proxy regional planning tool; cluster formation. Settlement cluster formation that focuses on the potentials of small and medium towns. Small and Medium towns are supposed to represent a necessary link between the complex, sophisticated urban life and the simple, undiluted rural existence. They tend to combine the attributes of the two space-economies (Urban and Rural). They are, therefore, instruments through which the much desired rural-urban linkages can be strengthened for sustainable urbanization. . ...

3. REDEVELOPMENT OF INDUSTRIAL LAND IN URBAN AREAS: OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS. A CASE STUDY OF TEXTILE MILL LAND REDEVELOPMENT IN MUMBAI

Ramakrishna NALLATHIGA

Urban Management Resource Group, Centre for Good Governance

India

Urban industrial land is an important and integral part of city land use. Mumbai had been the industrial power house of India since the British were in rule. It was a prime centre for cotton processing that directly fed into the cotton mills that were established in the subsequent phases of history. After led by the textile mills, several other large and medium scale industries were established in the post-independence era and the development plans made provision for the same through earmarking industrial zones for manufacturing, trade and logistics operations. Bombay has shown how to build the enormous potential in industrial production and almost became one of the country’s backbones of industries and economy. ....

4. VULNERABILITY OF URBAN INFORMAL SECTOR: STREET VENDORS IN YOGYAKARTA, INDONESIA

Aloysius Gunadi BRATA

Faculty of Economics, Atma Jaya Yogyakarta University

Indonesia

This study has been focusing on the vulnerability of street vendors in Java since the time when Java was hit severely by the economic crisis in 1997/1998, which also had reversed the trend of economic formalization in Indonesia. For this aim, a survey was conducted during the month of February 2007 in Yogyakarta and Sleman districts in Yogyakarta Special Province. The survey covered 122 street vendors in several streets in both areas. These samples consist of three groups of street vendors: food seller, non-food seller, and services providers. Based on this survey, vulnerability index of street vendors is measured. The study found that most of street vendors in Yogyakarta experience vulnerability at the medium level. In general, vulnerability of food seller vendors is higher than other vendors. Vulnerability also varies across the locations of vending. ....

5. METROPOLITAN GOVERNMENT AND IMPROVEMENT POTENTIALS OF URBAN BASIC SERVICES GOVERNANCE IN DHAKA CITY, BANGLADESH: RHETORIC OR REALITY?

Golam MOINUDDIN

Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Jahangirnagar University

Bangladesh

Urban basic services, namely water supply and sewerage, power supply, telecommunication, road network etc. are the prerequisites for city living. Efficiency in managing and maintaining urban basic services ultimately dictates the quality of an urban government. In the last three decades, Dhaka’s urban basic services governance has been tumbling behind the required standard. Specially, in the last five/six years the situation has reached to an alarming state— resulting to a high degree of inconvenience in urban living and loss of potentials in city economy. Frequent malfunctioning, limited capacity to expand, bureaucratic complexity in availing services, lack of public accountability etc. are some of the common characteristics of urban basic services in Dhaka. ...

6. RAPID URBAN SECTOR PROFILING FOR SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (RUSPS) IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR URBAN PLANNING IN ONDO STATE, NIGERIA

Johnson Bade FALADE

UN-HABITAT

Afolabi ARIBIGBOLA

Department of Geography and Planning Sciences, Adekunle Ajasin University

Nigeria

This paper explores the application of rapid urban profiling for sustainability studies (RUSPS) in articulating city strategic plans in developing countries with the aim of determining its implications for urban planning in Ondo State, Nigeria. Ondo State is one of the 36 states of Nigeria where urban planning is undertaken by the state government. It discusses the usefulness of the methodology to urban planning and suggests how it can be applied to re-invigorate urban planning activity in the state. The paper draws on document analysis, qualitative research as well as systematic survey of planning activities, departments and agencies of government as well as individuals involved in urban planning tasks in the study area. Other relevant materials and data are sourced from published sources.  ... 

7. FISCAL MANAGEMENT IN DANGILA MUNICIPALITY, ETHIOPIA. PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS

Edson MBEDZI

Ethiopian Civil Service College

Ethiopia

Tendayi GONDO

University of Venda

 South Africa

Fiscal decentralization is one component of decentralization that gives authority to local governments to collect revenue through taxes and responsibility over spending decisions. Even though fiscal decentralization has given revenue raising and spending decision powers to lower levels of government, the implementation process has often been a daunting task for many local authorities in the developing world. In the case of Ethiopia, decentralization has been implemented since 1991. However, revenue raising and expenditure management are not efficiently and effectively exercised, especially in lower level government units of Ethiopia. Insufficient revenue collection and reprehensible expenditure management leads to financial incapability such that public infrastructure and services could not be financed amply.  ...

8. URBAN DEVELOPMENT IN ZIMBABWE: A HUMAN SETTLEMENT PERSPECTIVE

Killian MUNZWA
Department of Rural and Urban Planning, University of Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe
Jonga WELLINGTON
Ethiopian Civil Service College

Ethiopia

This paper examines and analyses the historical development of Zimbabwean towns and cities with a view to tracing and understanding policy directions, urban spatial development trends and other factors such as population dynamics that may have led to the development of the present-day urban settlements in the country. The paper observes that whilst pre-colonial cities existed during the golden age of the Munhumutapa dynasty and empire, these had no influence on the modern town and city because they were too distant and their experiences had long been lost by the time the colonial town was introduced in the country, some four centuries later. ...

9. COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN IN URBAN ARcHITECTURE 3D MODELING

Nicolae Radu MÂRSANU
Silvia Mihaela RUSU
Academy of Economic Studies

Romania

The gap from the PC made sketches with the help of the china ink pen and ruler to the digitised drawing boards, high diagonal monitors and 3D projecting is truly spectacular. The increasingly efficient and more specialized programs allow the architects a whole range of facilities providing drawing commands and changes very easy to use, automatic rating, operating simultaneously in multiple windows, building sections and extracts of the plan, 3D views design and even projecting in virtual reality. Applications made to date using virtual reality technologies are characterized, essentially, by generating artificial world and immerging the user into this world. Evolution and effectiveness of such systems are conditioned, first, by the increased hardware performance (computers and specialized devices for interaction) so as to ensure a full immersion of man in the virtual world and, implicitly, a real-time communication with him. ...

10. THE ROLE OF URBAN MARKETING IN LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. A POLITICAL ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE

Franklin OBENG-ODOOM

Department of Political Economy, University of Sydney

Australia

The aggressive marketing of cities to attract private finance and capital is one important aspect of municipal neoliberalism. Urban marketing, as it is called, is said to be the the surest way to deliver urban economic development. Using a political-economic framework, this paper provides an alternative analysis of urban marketing, and highlights other avenues for addressing the urban question.  ...